Stories of a Lifetime: How to join this global story project!

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“How might we keep local legends, myths and fables alive whilst also sharing our place in the world?”

Stories of a Lifetime came together after a project between my foundation class and Jason Milner’s year 4 class in Sydney. For World Book Day 2016, my class studied stories from Australia as part of a whole school worldwide story project. To bring story telling to life, Jason’s class wrote and retold the story of Tiddalic the Frog. They illustrated the story and pieced it together using iMovie. The impact this form story telling and knowledge exchange had on my early years class was huge! Hearing the story retold by children who care about the story was much more meaningful, giving them greater context and a purpose to retell and write this story themselves. Here you can see children in my class writing the story of Tiddalic the Frog…

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“This is a boxed-up, ready to go, 1 week project I can use with my class. It’s a cross-curricular, local study my class work on and technology brings it together.”

We are now looking to build upon this experience with a bank of stories from around the world. Stories of a Lifetime is a place where local stories will stay alive forever. The stories will be wrote as scripts and retold by children in classrooms around the world. Children will illustrate the stories themselves and teachers will upload these video stories to Vimeo. They will submit the embed links to the Stories of a Lifetime website where we will link to them the country and region they are from.

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“It’s global collaboration without me needing to find any global connections myself.”

Children will be able to watch these short, 3 minute video stories from their classrooms and respond to them on their own class blogs. They will share their responses as comments on the class’s Vimeo page which is accessed through the Stories of Lifetime website.

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We imagine teachers using this resource as part of a week long project beginning with children researching their local area to find out what stories make their place famous, well-known or proud. They will work in teams to write the script and create the images from their own artwork. Bringing all of this work together, they will use story telling apps like Puppet Pals, Stop Motion, Book Creator or iMovie. Their stories will play for 3 minutes and you could host a class competition where the winning team can submit their story to Stories of a Lifetime website. You would upload their story to your school’s cloud video storage solution (such as YouTube or Vimeo) and share that embed link with us on the Story of a Lifetime website submission form. We will then embed your story video in to your country’s section on the site. The Stories of a Lifetime website has advice on what apps you could use to record the stories.

“Sharing stories is fascinating. It helps us  make comparisons between our place and yours.”

When I visited Brazil in October, Stories of a Lifetime was a lesson that I team taught with Roberta Ferraz at ABA Global School Recife. I shared the story of Robin Hood from Nottingham and the children learned the story. They retold it with their own images in Puppet Pals and are now researching their own local stories to share on Stories of a Lifetime website.

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Could you contribute to this project with your class?

Teachers from South Africa, Brazil, The Netherlands, Scotland, America and Canada are working on their stories right now. Could you join this project and submit your class’s story from your country or region too? Visit the Stories of a  Lifetime website to find out how you can submit your story.

One Best Photo with Chloe Webster

In the summer of 2016, I worked with the education rangers at Sherwood Pines to developScreen Shot 2016-05-22 at 09.05.04
a free resource for use at Forestry Commission sites. One Best
Photo is one outcome from this partnership and is a resource that can be used with early years and primary aged children. In the planning pack, teachers learn how to teach photography
skills to young learners whilst children capture the relationship between people, wildlife and timber. This resource is available for free on iTunes and the education rangers at Sherwood Pines are welcoming groups to their forest to use this pack for free. All you need to do it pack up your iPad devices and get your group to the forest!
Since publishing, One Best Photo has made its away to classes around the UK and across the world. At the Nursery World Show in January, I met Chloe Webster from Pebbles Childcare. Chloe took on some of the principles and practices of One Best Photo at her setting and kindly shares her experiences using this resource.

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The Re-Working of Work.

We are so lucky in the Early Years. We have a passport for change: Enabling Environments. It’s been in print from Development Matters 2012 and it means we are allowed to make changes that enhance the learning in our settings. Here’s what Development Matters says about Enabling Environments:

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It is an overarching principal which is still present in Early Years Outcomes, 2014, and we must hold on to this tightly with both hands because we are allowed to decide what an enabling environment looks like for the children that we teach every day! This post explores how I am using Future Work Skills 2020 to enable learning in my early years environment.

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Apple Classroom Counts for Early Years

With the introduction of Apple Classroom this summer, our iPad deployment at school became a lot smoother and manageable for teachers.

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For a long time we have relied on Guided Access in the Accessibility settings to manage learning in focus groups. Triple tapping the home button on each iPad was commonplace in our early years setting, locking in apps for particular tasks during the day. Now with Classroom, the whole process of teaching and learning is more robots. From the teacher iPad we are able to open, lock and view the screens of every iPad in our classroom.

This is really handy when using iPad 1:1 with our young learners. Even though our desirable outcome is for children to select and use apps for a purpose, when teaching a skill in Maths for example, Classroom really does count!

A Closer Look at Classroom

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This is a view of my teacher iPad running the Classroom app. You can see I have 5 iPad devices locked in to the Number Frames app. Each of the 5 iPad devices has a live view of the iPad screen in real time. I can tap the Lock icon at any time to freeze the iPad devices and I can launch any other app, book or website I want the group to use.

You can also see that I am managing different groups of iPad devices. There are 29 iPad devices all using Number Frames in the class and I can tap this group to see what each child is doing on their iPad. I know where and when to intervene just from glancing at Classroom at any time.
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Oh, Brazil, about what good things will you make me tell?

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fullsizerender-6Our time in Brazil wrapped up with a visit at the Mayor’s Office and a meeting with University of Pernambuco at the British Consulate. At both of these meetings planning for the future took place. Great progress has been made with local schools and partners here over the last 13 days and moving forwards with the onebillion maths intervention seems likely. On my final visit to ABA Global school I was presented with a gift from peace linguist, and President of the Board at ABA Global Education, Francisco Gomes de Matos:

“Oh, Brazil, about you what can I foresee well? You will be internationally admired. You will be educationally developed. You will be scientifically and technologically advanced. You will be interculturally comprehended.”

This resonates with me and our trip here. This articulates the aims we have for working with Brazil and assures me that Brazil makes a perfect partner in our projects and research.

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My Journey to Brazil

Today I head out to Recife, Brazil and it feels like the beginning of a great adventure. But whilst I wait for my connecting flight to Sao Paulo from Amsterdam, I look back at the 18 months which lead up to this moment.

 

Unlocking Talent Through Tablet Technology

Unlocking Talent is a research project supported by VSO and Norweigian Government. Lead by the University of Nottingham, the project evaluates the use of onebillion apps in closing the gap in maths. Beginning in Milawi, this research found that from 8 weeks of using the apps, children made 18 months learning gains in maths skills.

As this research continued, the University and onebillion questioned whether or not this way of working could be replicated beyond Milawi. This is where I joined the team and together we ran a pilot a study across the schools in the federation that I work for. We found similar learning gains here, as well as in other small scale pilot studies from UK schools. So in June, we launched the UK’s first ever large scale evaluation of tablet technology and maths attainment.

The apps are used with Early Years children that have been identified as working below age-related expectations. They work on activities set by the teacher in the app for up to 30 minutes a day. The learning is 1:1, personalised and self-paced. These children access this app as well as normal teaching practices and traditional interventions. When combined like this, the learning gains have been huge.

The findings from the initial UK pilot studies can be found here.

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Face to Face with the Experts

Introducing video conferencing software as a way of connecting my class and extending our reach is my one best thing. FaceTime calls are the back bone to the Connecting Classes Across Continents project that I collaborate on with a group of early learning Apple Distinguished Educators. We use the software to share learning and exchange knowledge between our classes.

I’ve been using FaceTime beyond this project though. Video conferencing can bring many more experts in to our classrooms. Those days when the fire engine visits schools and the police officers join us for question and answer are so valuable. There are many more experts that we can learn from who aren’t in our local area though. That’s where softwares like FaceTime extend our reach for knowledge exchange.

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